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Amanda Porterfield


Robert A. Spivey Professor of Religion

Departmental Area: American Religious History
Research Areas : American Religion, Politics and Law, American Protestant Thought, and Native American Religious History

Address: Department of Religion
641 University Way / P.O. Box 3061520
The Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306-1520
Office: 208 Dodd Hall
Email: aporterf@fsu.edu
Office Hours: By Appointment

Curriculum Vitae

Background


Amanda Porterfield is a historian of American religion with interests in the historical interplay of religion, politics and law, the history of American religious thought, and the historical study of Native American religions. She also works in the history of Christianity, is the author of Healing in the History of Christianity, and co-editor with John Corrigan of the quarterly journal Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture. Her most recent book is Conceived in Doubt: Religion and Politics in the New American Nation (Chicago, 2012); her current research focuses on religion in American law.

Research Interests


  • Religion, Politics and Law
  • American Protestant Thought
  • History of Christianity
  • Native American Religions

Selected Publications


Books >>See also in Amazon.com "Books by Amanda Porterfield"

Current Research Projects


Topic

  • Metaphysical Constructs Embedded in Early American Law

Recent Essays

Teaching Specializations


  • Religion in U.S. History
  • Historiography of American Religion
  • Native American Religious History
  • Puritanism
  • Romanticism
  • Religion and Politics in the U.S.
  • History of Christianity
  • World Religions

Lecture


Religion and Politics in the Early American Republic
Lecture at University of Maine, Farmington, October 1, 2010.

Lecture Video

 

Recent Courses


Spring 2014


REL3541        American Protestant Thought in Historical Context
This course will examine works by five influential American protestant thinkers, each of whom represents a different time in American protestant history. In class discussions and writing assignments, the course will focus on three questions: where did their ideas come from? what events conditioned their reformulation of ideas? how did their writings influence the course of events?

RLG6498-2    Sem: Religious Thought: REL/Politics Early US Republic
This graduate seminar will examine major changes in both religion and politics after the American Revolution. It will also consider important shifts in the meaning of "religion" and "politics" during this time, along with the new symbiotic relationship between religion and politics that formed in the early American republic.