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Carla Marie Reid

Department of Interdisciplinary Humanities

 

Departmental Area: Adjunct Faculty
Research Areas : Humanitarian Intervention and Counter-Terrorism within the Just War Tradition; War and Genocide in Literature and Film; Women and Creativity

Address: 432F Diffenbaugh
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306
Office: 421 Diffenbaugh
Email:
creid@fsu.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Background


Carla Marie Reid (PhD Humanities, 2003) currently teaches classes in ethics and in gender studies in the Department of Religion.  Her research has focused on religious ethics and violence, especially in the just war tradition.  She is most interested in how these systems of thought pertain to humanitarian intervention and counter-terrorism. 

Although most of her research has been on the just war tradition, her current work is on ethics and modern food production systems, which seem to have their own inherent violence.  She is currently teaching a class on Religious Ethics and Food, which explores the connections or disconnections between traditional and religious ways of thinking about food and those of the twenty-first century food industry. 


Recent Courses


Spring 2014


REL3171-01   Topics in Ethics: Environmental Ethics and Religion
This is a class exploring some of the philosophical and religious views on nature and the environment.  We will examine ideas about nature prevalent in the environmental ethics movement, both historically and in the present day.  We will focus on the convergence (and sometimes divergence) of religious thought and an ethic of environmental care, and in so doing we will explore ideas of stewardship as well as a more biocentric approach, as well as feminist environmental ethics and deep ecology. The class will be grounded in the texts of some of the mainstays of Western environmental thinking and will help students explore different expressions of environmental values.

Fall 2013


REL3171-02        Topics in Ethics: Human Rights 
This course examines the history and dynamics (including the role of religion) of crimes against humanity as an introduction to the international human rights movement.  It will do this by focusing on three historical cases, which together span the twentieth century: the Belgian Congo, the Holocaust, and the Rwanda genocide. Course materials will include works of literature, historical narratives, essay collections and film. A major thesis of the course is that by focusing on such works we will not only become familiar with human rights thinking and practice but also be encouraged to acquire a critical and imaginative human rights sensibility for understanding the perpetration and prevention of atrocities.