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Matthew Day


Associate Professor of Religion
Associate Director, Program in the History and Philosophy of Science

 

Departmental Area: Religion, Ethics, and Philosophy
Research Areas: Early Modern Natural Philosophy; History of Science; History of Western Religious Thought; Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Anglo-American Philosophy

Address: Department of Religion
641 University Way / P.O. Box 3061520
The Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306-1520
Office: 120B Dodd Hall
Email: mday@fsu.edu
Office Hours: TBA

Curriculum Vitae

Background


Matthew Day (Ph.D., Brown 2003) teaches courses in the History of Religion and Science in the West, Theorizing the Academic Study of Religion, and the Philosophy of Religion.  He is currently the Editor of Method & Theory in the Study of Religion.

Research Interests


  • Cognitive Approaches to the Study of Religion
  • History of the Anthropology of Religion
  • History and Philosophy of Biology
  • History of the Brain Sciences

Selected Publications


Articles

  • “Reading the Fossils of Faith: Thomas Henry Huxley and the Evolutionary Subtext of the Synoptic Problem,” Church History. Volume 74, 3 (2005).
  • “The Undiscovered and Undiscoverable Essence: Species and Religion After Darwin,” Journal of Religion. Volume 85, 1 (January 2005): 58-82.
  • “Religion, Off-Line Cognition and the Extended Mind,” Journal of Cognition and Culture. Volume 4, 1 (2004): 101-121.

Teaching Specializations


  • History of Religion and Science in the West
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • History of Theoretical Approaches to the Study of Religion
  • Modern Religious Thought
  • 19th and 20th Century Anglo-American Literature

Recent Graduate Seminars


  • Empiricism Before Science
  • The Historiography of Religion & Science: The Problem of “Revolution”
  • Power, Knowledge and Control:  Foucault and the History of the Social Sciences
  • Freud and the Invention of the Modern Mind

Recent Cources

Fall 2014


REL3142                Religion: Self and Society 
This course is structured around the principle that we should abandon the habit of treating some discourses or practices as being irreducibly distinct from mundane political and economic life.  Rather, we must learn to recognize how the behaviors commonly identified as tokens of “religion” represent a form of politics that has been strategically represented as non-political in nature. Figures discussed will include John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, J.S. Mill and Carl Schmidt.

 

Spring 2014


HUM2937      Humanities Honors Seminar:  Religion & Capitalism
Meets LS Humanities and Writing requirements as well as Multicultural X.

REL3142        Religion, Self, and Society
This course is structured around the methodological principle that we should abandon the habit of treating some discourses or practices as being irreducibly distinct from mundane political and economic life.  That is to say, the very idea of religion should be viewed as a piece of political rhetoric instead of a substantive term of analysis.  Thus, we must learn to recognize how the modern discourse on religion allows otherwise unexceptional behaviors, beliefs, and communities to be strategically represented as fundamentally “set-apart” in order to protect or condemn them.